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European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC): outpatient parenteral antibiotic treatment in Europe

Abstract number: O400

Coenen S., Muller A., Adriaenssens N., Vankerckhoven V., Hendrickx E., Goossens H.

Objectives: To assess the proportion of outpatient parenteral antibiotic treatment on the total outpatient antibiotic use in Europe, and to identify the antibiotic groups and substances most commonly administered this way.

Methods: The European Surveillance of Antimicrobial Consumption (ESAC; www.esac.ua.ac.be) project, now funded by the European Center for Disease Control and Prevention (ECDC; agreement number 2007/001), continues to collect data on antimicrobial consumption for all Member States, candidate countries and EFTA-EEA countries using the anatomic chemical therapeutic (ATC) and defined daily dose (DDD) classification. For 2005, data on outpatient use of antibacterial for systemic use (ATC J01), aggregated at the level of the active substance and expressed in DDD per 1000 inhabitants per day (DID; WHO version 2007) were extracted by route of administration and by country. The primary outcome measure is the total parenteral use expressed as a percentage of the total outpatient antibiotic use in DID.

Results: The average proportion of outpatient parenteral antibiotic treatment in 20 (total use data for Greece, Bulgaria and Iceland) European countries in 2005 is 1.77%, ranging from 12.33% in Russia to 0.01% in Czech Republic (see figure), while the total outpatient use ranges from 28.94 DID in France (34.73 DID in Greece is total use) to in Russia 9.16 DID. The three most commonly used antibiotic groups for parenteral treatment are the cephalosporins (J01D; 43.36%, from 73.68% in Finland to 0% in Norway), the penicillins (J01C; 24.44%, from 74.49% in Hungary to 0% in Norway) and the aminoglycosides (J01G; 13.81%, from 75.28% in Norway to 0% in Estonia). The three most commonly used antibiotic substances for parenteral treatment are cefazolin (J01DB04; 12.02%, from 35.89% in Russia to 0% in more than one country), ceftriaxone (J01DD04; 10.89%, from 50.04% in France to 0% in more than one country) and cefuroxime (J01DC02; 7.32%, from 48.35% in Poland to 0% in more than one country).

Conclusion: Outpatient parenteral antibiotic treatment only represents more than 1% of the total outpatient antibiotic use in 6 out of the 20 European countries studied. However, as for the total outpatient antibiotic use and the use of different antibiotic groups and substances, there is a striking variation in the proportions of parenteral antibiotic use in Europe as well. More in-depth data on outpatient antibiotic use are needed to explain this variation.

Session Details

Date: 19/04/2008
Time: 00:00-00:00
Session name: 18th European Congress of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Subject:
Location: Barcelona, Spain
Presentation type:
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