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Effects of education on the importance of blood cultures by an infection control team: experience in two community hospitals, Kyoto, Japan

Abstract number: 1734_138

Saito T., Aoki Y., Matsuoka A., Iinuma Y., Takakura S., Fujiwara N., Kohi F., Noguchi M., Ichiyama S.

Objectives: Blood culture is the only method for detecting bloodstream infections. Infection control team at each hospital grasped through ward round that blood culture examinations were not carried out sufficiently. The infection control team of each hospital educated medical staff about the importance of blood culture examinations.

Patients and Methods: This study was conducted from January 2003 to December 2003 at A hospital (179 beds) and from October 2003 to September 2005 at B hospital (500 beds). Each hospital was acute-phase community hospital. The yields of microorganisms and the characteristics of patients with clinical significant bacteraemia and/or fungaemia were compared for pre-education (January to June, 2003 at A hospital and October 2003 to September 2004 at B hospital) and post-education periods (July to December, 2003 at A hospital and October 2004 to September 2005 at B hospital).

Results: During the pre-education period, 193 blood cultures were taken from 111 patients, compared to 467 blood cultures (2.4-fold increase) from 245 patients (2.2-fold increase) during the post-education period at A hospital. Of these, 40 positive cultures were obtained from 30 patients in the pre-intervention period, compared to 65 positive cultures (1.8-fold increase) were obtained from 55 patients (1.7-fold increase) in the post-intervention period. At B hospital, during the pre-education period, 1159 blood cultures were taken from 667 patients, compared to 2175 blood cultures (1.8-fold increase) from 1141 patients (1.7-fold increase) during the post-education period. Among these, 139 positive cultures were obtained from 112 patients in the pre-education period, compared to 213 positive cultures (1.5-fold increase) were obtained from 166 patients (1.4-fold increase) in the post-education period.

Conclusion: The present study has shown that cases of bacteraemia or fungaemia may be overlooked if blood culture examinations are not performed. We consider that the importance of blood cultures must be emphasized and education needs to be continued.

Session Details

Date: 31/03/2007
Time: 00:00-00:00
Session name: European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Subject:
Location: ICC, Munich, Germany
Presentation type:
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