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Cardiovascular risk evaluation in HIV-infected adults

Abstract number: 1733_148

Sousa S., Valadas E., Lopes Cruz J.P., Doroana M., Tavares L., Caldeira L., Duarte N., Antunes F.

Objectives: Metabolic changes caused by antiretroviral therapy may increase risk of cardiovascular disease. The aim of this study is to quantify cardiovascular risk (CVR) and to determine the prevalence of CVR factors in HIV-infected adults, as well as, to suggest strategies for decreasing CVR.

Methods: In a cross-sectional study, HIV-infected individuals were evaluated during a six-month period, at Hospital de Santa Maria, Lisbon. Data collected includes: demographic variables, antiretroviral therapy, duration of HIV infection, smoking habit, diabetes mellitus and family history of cardiovascular disease. Height, weight, blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, glucose and triglycerides levels were determined. Estimates of 10-year CVR were based on Framingham's equation.

Results: In the 1,340 patients included: the average age was 42.1 years, 66.7% were men, 49.1% were smokers, 36% had hypertension, 4.4% had diabetes, 15% had elevated cholesterol levels (>6.2 mmol/l) and 13.5% had low HDL-cholesterol levels (<0.9 mmol/l). Estimated 10-year CVR average was 5.2%. CVR average for patients on antiretroviral treatment (5.86%) is almost twice than for naïve patients (3.2%). An elevated CVR (>20%) was found in 4.4% of the patients, most of them were on non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or on protease inhibitors based treatments. To stop smoking was the measure with the highest impact on CVR decrease, followed by normalising lipid levels.

Conclusion: HIV-infected patients show several cardiovascular risk factors. Patients should be encouraged to change their lifestyle (smoking cessation, diet and exercise) and in some cases of important lipidaemia changes in antiretroviral treatment should be considered.

Session Details

Date: 31/03/2007
Time: 00:00-00:00
Session name: European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases
Subject:
Location: ICC, Munich, Germany
Presentation type:
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