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A 3-year descriptive study of intestinal parasite infections in outpatients in Madrid, Spain (2000–02)

Abstract number: 902_p601

Tajada Alegre P.

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Background:

Intestinal parasite infections have increased in our country mainly because of easier access to international travel and immigration.

Objective:

To know the prevalence of intestinal parasite infections in outpatients attending to a health area (Area 1, Madrid, Spain).

Patients and methods:

11 016 faecal samples (10 346 stools, 604 perianal swabs and 66 adhesive tapes for diagnosis of pinworms) were processed from 5757 patients between January 2000 and December 2002. Origin of samples and seasonal incidence of the parasites found together with epidemiological data as gender, age and geographical origin of infected subjects were analysed. Stools were concentrated using a disposable parasite concentrator with formalin-ethyl acetate (Biosepar, Germany). Coccidian oocysts were screened on direct and concentrated faecal smears stained by a modified Kinyoun acid-fast staining.

Results

53.3% of parasitised patients were from foreign origin, mainly from South America (91.7%; of which 79.8% were Ecuadorian subjects). The overall prevalence of intestinal parasitisms was 15.6% (1723 faecal specimens belonging to 882 patients with 2353 parasites identified). The prevalence of the parasites found was: Blastocystis hominis (34.1%), Giardia intestinalis (17%), Entamoeba coli (15.6%), Endolimax nana (14.7%), Enterobius vermicularis (4.6%), Trichuris trichiura (3.9%), Cryptosporidium parvum (2.6%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (1.8%), Strongyloides stercoralis (1.3%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.2%), Hymenolepis nana (1.2%), Lodamoeba butschlii (0.6%), Taenia saginata (0.5%), hookworms (0.4%) and Chilomastix mesnili (0.2%). Considering only the pathogen species, Giardia intestinalis was the most prevalent (48.8%) followed by Enterobius vermicularis (13.2%), Trichuris trichiura (11.4%), Cryptosporidium parvum (7.6%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (5.3%), Strongyloides stercoralis (3.8%), Ascaris lumbricoides (3.5%), Hymenolepis nana (3.5%), Taenia saginata (1.6%) and hookworms (1.2%). The frequency of double, triple, quadruple and quintuple infections was 19.7, 5.9, 1.8 and 0.4%, respectively. Samples processed and parasite detected in 2002 have increased by 82.7 and 166.7%, respectively with regard to 2000.

Conclusions:

Our findings suggest that parasitic infections are still a public health problem with a high prevalence. The knowledge of the situation in each area facilitates its management and control.

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Session Details

Date: 01/08/2007
Time: 00:00-00:00
Session name: XXIst ISTH Congress
Subject:
Location: Oxford, UK
Presentation type:
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