Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 63,
November 2011 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Chicago, Illinois November 4-9, 2011.


Physical Activity and Frequent Sleep Insufficiency Among US Adults with Arthritis.

Hootman1,  Jennifer M., Carroll2,  Dianna, McKnight-Eily2,  Lela, Allen3,  Kelli D.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Kennesaw, GA
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
Duke and Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC

Background/Purpose:

Sleep problems occur in 30–80% of adults with arthritis. Physical activity may be a non-pharmaceutical approach to improving sleep. The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of sleep insufficiency and its association with physical activity (PA) level among adults with self-reported doctor-diagnosed arthritis (ARTH).

Methods:

Using the 2009 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS, n=424,592; n=153,914 with ARTH) we calculated moderate-intensity-equivalent minutes/week (2*vigorous min/wk + moderate min/wk) of self-reported PA for each respondent. Three PA levels were defined as: Active (ACT) (>=150 min/wk), insufficiently active (INSUF) (>10 – 149 min/wk), and inactive (INACT) (no PA for at least 10 min/wk). Frequent sleep insufficiency (FSI) was defined as reporting not getting enough sleep or rest for 14 or more days in the past 30. Weighted prevalence estimates (%) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated accounting for the complex sample design. Multivariable logistic regression models (adjusted odds ratios, AOR) were used to assess the association between PA level (INACT = referent) and FSI among adults with ARTH.

Results:

Among adults with arthritis, 32% reported 0 days, 36% 1–13 days, and 32% 14+ days (adults without arthritis 30%, 44%, and 26% respectively). [FIGURE] The prevalence of FSI was significantly higher (p<0.0001) among adults with ARTH (31.9%, CI 31.5–32.4) compared to adults without ARTH (25.9%, CI 25.6–26.3). Among adults with arthritis, FSI prevalence decreased as PA level increased (39.4% INACT, 31.1% INSUF, 29.9% ACT, p<0.0001). Compared to INACT, INSUF (crude OR=0.71, CI 0.67–0.75) and ACT (crude OR=0.75, CI 0.71–0.80) PA levels were associated with lower odds of FSI. These adjusted associations remained statistically significant (INSUF AOR=0.89, CI 0.84–0.95; ACT AOR=0.83, CI 0.77–0.89) after adjustment for demographic variables (age, sex, race/ethnicity, education), health status variables (body mass index, self-rated health, arthritis-attributable activity limitation, joint pain) and co-morbid conditions (diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, asthma, frequent mental distress).

Conclusion:

1 in 3 adults with ARTH report FSI. Adults with ARTH meeting ACT levels of PA were 17% less likely to report FSI than INACT, suggesting physical activity may be a promising strategy to decrease FSI in this population. These findings need to be verified in prospective studies.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Hootman, Jennifer M., Carroll, Dianna, McKnight-Eily, Lela, Allen, Kelli D.; Physical Activity and Frequent Sleep Insufficiency Among US Adults with Arthritis. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2011;63 Suppl 10 :2542
DOI:

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