Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 63,
November 2011 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Chicago, Illinois November 4-9, 2011.


Subclinical Atherosclerosis In Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases.

Nemes1,  Dan, Dragoi1,  Mihai, Catan1,  Liliana, Amaricai1,  Elena, Popa1,  Daniel, Onofrei1,  Roxana, Surducan1,  Dan

"Victor Babes" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Timisoara, Romania
City Universitary and Emergency Hospital, Timisoara, Romania

Background/Purpose:

Increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in rheumatic patients cannot be entirely explained by traditional cardiovascular risk factors, suggesting that the systemic inflammation may accelerate atherosclerosis. The aim of the present study is to link chronic inflammation with atherosclerosis in patients with systemic rheumatic diseases.

Methods:

The cohort study was performed during an eighteen-month period (between November 2009 and April 2011) and enrolled 200 patients with systemic rheumatic disorders. Patients' mean age was 55.4 ± 8.18 years. 67 patients from this cohort group were selected. Subclinical atherosclerosis was assessed by the common carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and flow mediated vasodilatation (FMD) of the brachial artery on B-mode ultrasound images, with the use of a 10 MHz linear-array transducer.

Results:

Mean value of IMT at the right common carotid was 0.9 ± 0.19mm and at the left common carotid 0.9 ± 0.34mm. FMD was 8.0 ± 5.77%. ESR (Erythrocyte sedimentation rate) was increased in 80% patients, while CRP (C-reactive protein) was increased in 50% of the studied patients. We found a negative correlation between FMD and ESR (r=-0,397) or CRP (r=-0,628). Mean values of IMT was associated with ESR (r= 0,276) and CRP (r= 0,613). Disease activity was correlated with endothelial dysfunction as measured by intima-media thickness or by flow-mediated dilatation.

Conclusion:

In our study we found an increased endothelial dysfunction as measured by intima-media thickness or by flow-mediated dilatation. Endothelial dysfunction was correlated with elevated levels of ESR and CRP suggesting that chronic inflammatory status promotes atherosclerosis. Disease activity was correlated with endothelial dysfunction as measured by intima-media thickness or by flow-mediated dilatation.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Nemes, Dan, Dragoi, Mihai, Catan, Liliana, Amaricai, Elena, Popa, Daniel, Onofrei, Roxana, et al; Subclinical Atherosclerosis In Inflammatory Rheumatic Diseases. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2011;63 Suppl 10 :1055
DOI:

Abstract Supplement

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