Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 63,
November 2011 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Chicago, Illinois November 4-9, 2011.


Incidence of Hip Symptoms and Radiographic and Symptomatic Hip Osteoarthritis in African Americans and Caucasians: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

Do1,  Barbara T., Murphy1,  Louise, Helmick1,  Charles G., Barbour1,  Kamil E., Cheng1,  Yiling J., Jordan2,  Joanne M.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA
UNC Thurston Arthritis Center, Chapel Hill, NC

Background/Purpose:

Estimate the population-based incidence of 4 hip osteoarthritis (hOA)-related outcomes.

Methods:

We analyzed baseline (1991–1997) and first follow up (1999–2005) data from Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project participants (n=1,423; aged > 45 years). The 4 outcomes were: 1) hip symptoms (pain, aching, and/or stiffness on most days in their hip and/or groin); 2 & 3) radiographic and severe radiographic hOA (Kellgren-Lawrence [K-L] radiographic grade of >2 and >3, respectively); and 4) symptomatic hOA (K-L radiographic grade of >2 and hip symptoms in the radiographically affected hip). Incidence rates were calculated overall and stratified (age; sex; race; highest education attainment; body mass index [BMI] at age 18 and at baseline; and history of hip injury in affected hip) for each outcome among those who did not have the outcome at baseline.

Results:

The overall incidence rates (people per 100 person-years) were 5.5 for hip symptoms, 2.2 for radiographic hOA, 1.7 for symptomatic hOA, and 0.3 for severe radiographic hOA. The subgroup analysis indicated that incidence rates generally rose with increasing age, self-reported BMI at age 18, and clinically measured BMI at baseline and were higher among women and those with a history of hip injury. The largest absolute difference in incidence for any characteristic was for hip symptoms among those with and without a history of hip injury (9.2 and 5.3, respectively). Across all subgroups, incidence was generally higher among African Americans than Caucasians.

Conclusion:

The incidence of 4 hip OA-related outcomes in this >45 year old population ranged from 0.3 to 5.5% each year. For each outcome, older age, being female, and having a history of hip injury were all predictors of increased incidence. Our findings indicate that greater intervention efforts (self-management education, physical activity, weight management, joint injury prevention) may reduce the onset and effects of these outcomes.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Do, Barbara T., Murphy, Louise, Helmick, Charles G., Barbour, Kamil E., Cheng, Yiling J., Jordan, Joanne M.; Incidence of Hip Symptoms and Radiographic and Symptomatic Hip Osteoarthritis in African Americans and Caucasians: The Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2011;63 Suppl 10 :879
DOI:

Abstract Supplement

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