Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 63,
November 2011 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Chicago, Illinois November 4-9, 2011.


Moderate and Heavy Alcohol Use Is Associated with Less Patient-Derived Inflammation and Better Health-Related Quality of Life in Female Swedish Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients. Data From BARFOT, a Multicenter Study on Early RA.

Soderlin,  Maria K., Symeonidou,  Sofia, Andersson,  Maria, Bergman,  Stefan

Background/Purpose:

Earlier studies report a positive effect of alcohol use on disease activity rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The aim of this study was to study alcohol use and its effects on disease activity in Swedish RA patients.

Methods:

Between 1992 and 2005, 2800 patients were included in the BARFOT early RA study in Sweden. Disease Activity Score 28 joints (DAS28), C-reactive protein (CRP), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), rheumatoid factor (RF), general health and pain visual analog scales (VAS), and drug treatment were registered at inclusion and at follow-up at 3, 6 and 12 months and 2, 5, 8 and 15 years. EULAR response and remission criteria were applied at the same follow-up points. In 2010, a self-completed postal questionnaire was sent to 2102 patients (all prevalent patients) in the BARFOT study enquiring about life style factors. Alcohol use was assessed using the self-completed validated questionnaire AUDIT-C.

Results:

In 2010 1238/1460 (85%) of the patients had data on alcohol use: 11% were non-drinkers, 67% moderate drinkers and 21% heavy drinkers. Women who drank moderately or heavily had lower patient-reported disease activity and higher health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a cross-sectional analysis in 2010, but no effect of alcohol use on disease activity was seen in men. For current smokers alcohol use was only associated with fewer patient-derived swollen joints. Female moderate and heavy drinkers had lower physician-reported DAS28 levels up to 5 years of follow-up, which were driven by lower ESR levels. Alcohol use did not emerge as an independent predictive factor for higher EuroQol, HAQ or VAS scores in multivariate regression models adjusted for sex, age, disease duration, smoking status and socioeconomic status.

Conclusion:

A total of 21% of patients were heavy drinkers. Women who drank moderately or heavily had best patient-derived disease activity and HRQL, but no effect of alcohol on patient-derived disease activity was seen in men. Women drinking heavily or moderately had lower physician-reported DAS28 up to 5 years of follow-up due to lower ESR.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Soderlin, Maria K., Symeonidou, Sofia, Andersson, Maria, Bergman, Stefan; Moderate and Heavy Alcohol Use Is Associated with Less Patient-Derived Inflammation and Better Health-Related Quality of Life in Female Swedish Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients. Data From BARFOT, a Multicenter Study on Early RA. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2011;63 Suppl 10 :356
DOI:

Abstract Supplement

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