Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 62,
November 2010 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Atlanta, Georgia November 6-11, 2010.


Measuring Changes in Calcifications in Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM) Using Single Slice Computerized Tomography (CT).

Ibarra5,  Maria F., Rigsby3,  Cynthia, Morgan2,  Gabrielle, Wang1,  Deli, Pachman4,  Lauren M.

Children's Memorial Research Center's Biostatistics Core, Chicago, IL
Clinical Immunology, Children's Memorial Research Center (CMRC), Chicago, IL
Division of Radiology, Children's Memorial Hospital (CMH), Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Children's Memorial Research Center (CMRC), Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL
Division of Rheumatology, Children's Memorial Hospital (CMH), Feinberg School of Medicine, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL

Objective:

To determine the utility of single slice CT to measure change in the volume of calcifications in patients with JDM over time.

Methods:

Children with definite/possible JDM and severe calcifications had at least two CT scans over a 2 year period. Severe calcifications were defined as a deep sheet- like deposits within intramuscular fascia, and were identified by physical examination and/or previous x rays. The limited four slice CT study focused on the area of greatest calcium burden. The area enclosing the calcification was calculated from the CT images, using a CT post processing workstation. Demographic and baseline characteristics were summarized by descriptive statistics. Generalized linear models were applied to analyze changes in the volume of calcifications and their association between clinical variables including DAS (Disease activity score) skin, DAS muscle, and the number of nailfold ERL (end row capillary loops). Data analysis used SAS 9.2.

Results:

11 children with JDM and severe calcifications were recruited. 8 patients were female; 8 were Caucasian. The average age was 13.84 years (+/- 4.9 years). The average duration of untreated disease at JDM diagnosis was 7.57 (+/- 7.2) months, and they all had active disease for an average=100 months +/- 65. The volume of calcifications changed significantly over time (p<0.0001). Decrease in calcification volume was significantly associated with decrease in DAS skin (p=0.0002) and improvement in the number of nailfold ERL (p=0.0025) but not with change in DAS muscle.

Conclusion:

This limited CT technique provides objective measurement of the volume of calcifications over time that may be helpful as a research tool to monitor progression and regression of dystrophic deposits in JDM and other rheumatic diseases.

Supported by NIAMS R01 AR48289- and the Cure-JM Foundation

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Ibarra, Maria F., Rigsby, Cynthia, Morgan, Gabrielle, Wang, Deli, Pachman, Lauren M.; Measuring Changes in Calcifications in Juvenile Dermatomyositis (JDM) Using Single Slice Computerized Tomography (CT). [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2010;62 Suppl 10 :1686
DOI: 10.1002/art.29451

Abstract Supplement

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