Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 62,
November 2010 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Atlanta, Georgia November 6-11, 2010.


A Model of Quality Patient-Health Care Provider Communication.

Salt1,  Elizabeth, Rowles2,  Graham

University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
University of Kentucky

Background:

Quality treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) includes effective communication between patients and health care providers (Lempp, Scott, & Kingsley, 2006). Effective patient-health care provider communication may have a positive effect on health outcomes, medication adherence, and a trusting patient-health care provider relationship, and a negative effect on the number of complaints to medical regulatory authorities (Berrios-Rivera et al., 2006; Tamblyn et al., 2007; Viller et al., 1999; Wolfe, 1995). The purpose of this study is to develop a model of the patient's perception of quality patient-health care provider communication.

Methods:

Following Medical Institutional Review Board approval, a sample of 15 English-speaking patients with RA were recruited from a university rheumatology clinic to participate in two focus groups sessions (n = 6) and individual interviews (n = 9). Verified transcripts from the audio-recorded interviews were analyzed using constant comparative analysis (Straus & Corbin, 1990). The resulting codes were collapsed into themes which were organized into a model of the patient's perception of quality patient-health care provider communication.

Findings:

The model of the patient's perception of quality patient-health care provider communication involves dynamic interactions between the patient and health care provider. Participants described entering the encounter with past experiences and outside influences. They explained their symptoms and concerns and asked their health care provider questions. Participants felt that their health care provider should both listen to them and believe the information reported. Participants reported that the health care provider, who can come to the encounter with assumptions, should disseminate information, ask questions, and make recommendations. The participants in this study felt that providers should be personable, empathetic, respectful, un-hurried and caring during this interaction. They also felt that health care providers should be honest, straightforward, positive, and decisive when providing accurate information using face-to-face conversation or visual aids.

Conclusion:

A model of the patient's perception of quality patient-health care provider communication has been developed. This model, if substantiated, can further our understanding of patient-health care provider communication and provide direction for future research.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Salt, Elizabeth, Rowles, Graham; A Model of Quality Patient-Health Care Provider Communication. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2010;62 Suppl 10 :1332
DOI: 10.1002/art.29098

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