Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 62,
November 2010 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Atlanta, Georgia November 6-11, 2010.


Type of Activity Pacing Instruction Affects Physical Activity Variability in Adults with Symptomatic Knee or Hip Osteoarthritis.

Murphy2,  Susan L., Smith1,  Dylan M., Lyden,  Angela K.

StonyBrook University
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI

Objective:

In a recent trial, we examined the effect of two different activity pacing interventions, general versus tailored, on symptom management for people with knee or hip osteoarthritis and found that fatigue was improved after the tailored compared to the general intervention. The current study was done to examine the secondary effect of activity pacing instruction on objective physical activity patterns (using ambulatory monitoring).

Methods:

Thirty two adults with knee or hip osteoarthritis, who were randomly stratified by age and gender, received either tailored or general activity pacing instruction. Both interventions involved two sessions with an occupational therapist. All participants wore an accelerometer for five days that measured physical activity and allowed for repeated symptom assessment at baseline (which was used for tailored activity pacing instruction) and at the 10 week follow-up period. Activity patterns were assessed by examining: physical activity variability, measured using the standard deviation of 5-day average activity counts per minute, and average activity level, the 5-day average activity counts per minute.

Results:

Physical activity variability decreased in the tailored group and increased in the general group. Participants in the tailored and general groups did not have significant changes in their average physical activity from baseline to 10 week follow-up.

Conclusion:

The type of activity pacing instruction affected the objective physical activity of adults with symptomatic knee or hip OA. Tailored activity pacing was more effective at reducing high and low activity bouts corresponding to the message of keeping a steady pace to reduce symptoms.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Murphy, Susan L., Smith, Dylan M., Lyden, Angela K.; Type of Activity Pacing Instruction Affects Physical Activity Variability in Adults with Symptomatic Knee or Hip Osteoarthritis. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2010;62 Suppl 10 :1319
DOI: 10.1002/art.29085

Abstract Supplement

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