Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 62,
November 2010 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Atlanta, Georgia November 6-11, 2010.


Network Analysis of Associations between Serum Interferon Alpha, Serology, and Clinical Features in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in a Large Multi-Ancestral Cohort.

Weckerle6,  Corinna E., Franek7,  Beverly S., Kelly2,  Jennifer, Kumabe7,  Marissa, Mikolaitis5,  Rachel, Green7,  Stephanie, Bruner3,  Gail R.

Oklahoma Med Research Foundation, Oklahoma City, OK
Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation
Oklahoma Medical Rsrch, Oklahoma City, OK
Rush University Med Ctr, Chicago, IL
Rush University Med Ctr
Univ of Chicago Med Ctr, Chicago, IL
Univ of Chicago Med Ctr
Univ of OK Hlth Sci Ctr, Oklahoma City, OK
University of Chicago, Chicago, IL

Background:

Interferon-alpha (IFN-a) is a primary pathogenic factor in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and high IFN-a levels may be associated with particular clinical manifestations. The prevalence of individual clinical and serologic features differs significantly by ancestry. We used logistic regression modeling to establish the network of associations between clinical and serologic manifestations and serum IFN-a in SLE patients from multiple ancestral backgrounds.

Methods:

We analyzed the presence or absence of ACR clinical criteria for SLE, autoantibodies, and high serum IFN-a in 1089 SLE patients (387 African-American, 186 Hispanic-American, and 516 European-American). Iterative multivariate logistic regression was performed in each background separately to establish associations between variables, and network diagrams were constructed illustrating associations that were significant following Bonferroni correction.

Results:

We found 14 unique associations forming network maps of relatively sparse density in each background. Of those, only 7 associations were shared by more than one ancestral background. Network maps of the interactions between clinical criteria were different in different ancestral backgrounds. In contrast, associations between autoantibodies and IFN-a were very similar in different backgrounds. In all backgrounds, high IFN-a was associated with presence of anti-Ro and anti-dsDNA antibodies (p-values 4.6×10-18 and 2.9 ×10-16 respectively). IFN-a and serology were not associated with ACR clinical features in these multivariate models.

Conclusions:

Serum IFN-a was strongly and consistently associated with serology, and not independently associated with clinical features in SLE. Our study suggests that IFN-a may be more relevant to humoral tolerance and initial disease pathogenesis than ongoing late clinical disease manifestations.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Weckerle, Corinna E., Franek, Beverly S., Kelly, Jennifer, Kumabe, Marissa, Mikolaitis, Rachel, Green, Stephanie, et al; Network Analysis of Associations between Serum Interferon Alpha, Serology, and Clinical Features in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus in a Large Multi-Ancestral Cohort. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2010;62 Suppl 10 :1164
DOI: 10.1002/art.28930

Abstract Supplement

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