Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 62,
November 2010 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Atlanta, Georgia November 6-11, 2010.


Hip Involvement Concerns 18 of Spondyloarthritis Patients, Is Often Bilateral and Total Joint Replacement Leads to Good Functional Results in These Patients.

Burki,  Vincent, Paternotte,  Simon, Elhai,  Muriel, Fabreguet,  Isabelle, Koumakis,  Eugenie, Meyer,  Magali, Payet,  Judith

Background:

Hip involvement is a common but little studied feature of spondyloarthritis (SpA).

Objective:

To study the prevalence and clinical features of hip involvement, in a cohort of patients with spondylarthritis (SpA) in a tertiary care center.

Methods:

Study design: retrolective single center observational study in 2010 (COSPA). Patients: definite SpA (Amor's criteria). Each patient underwent direct interview by a physician. Data collection: prevalence of hip involvement, and if present, the date of appearance, the localization and nature of the pain, treatments performed (intra-articular injections, surgery) and outcomes of total joint replacement (TJR). Analysis: descriptive analysis.

Results:

To date, 148 consecutive SpA patients were assessed: 26/148 patients (18%) suffered from SpA-associated hip involvement; median age 44.2 (range 25.9–69.4) years, median symptom duration 23.5 (5–51) years, 22 (85%) were men, 22/24 (92%) were B27 positive. 22/26 (85%) of patients with hip involvement had been treated by anti TNF at data collection versus 65/120 (54%) of other patients. Hip involvement appeared during the first 5 years of disease duration in 68% and during the first 10 years in 81%. Prevalence varied according to SpA predominant manifestation: more frequent in axial patients (20%, 22/110), than in peripheral disease (14%, 4/29). Hip involvement was bilateral in 46% (12/26) and unilateral in 54% (14/26); 11 patients (46%) received intra articular corticoid injections (of which, 23% were triamcinolone hexacetonide). In all, 9 patients (6% of the whole group and 36% of patients with hip involvement) had a TJR; the median delay between first hip symptoms and TJR was 36 months (range 0–27 years). After a median follow-up of TJR of 101 months (range 2– 27 years), TJR was considered as having a good function in 100% and only 22% (2/9) patients had TJR complications with a second TJR of the hip for both of them.

Conclusion:

Hip involvement occurs in 18% of our SpA patients; hip involvement seems to start usually in the first 10 years of the disease (81% of our patients) with almost equal bilateral or unilateral involvement. TJR is still the best treatment at the moment for serious destruction, with good results even if corticoid intra articular injections are used to retard it.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Burki, Vincent, Paternotte, Simon, Elhai, Muriel, Fabreguet, Isabelle, Koumakis, Eugenie, Meyer, Magali, et al; Hip Involvement Concerns 18 of Spondyloarthritis Patients, Is Often Bilateral and Total Joint Replacement Leads to Good Functional Results in These Patients. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2010;62 Suppl 10 :529
DOI: 10.1002/art.28298

Abstract Supplement

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