Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 62,
November 2010 Abstract Supplement

Abstracts of the American College of
Rheumatology/Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals
Annual Scientific Meeting
Atlanta, Georgia November 6-11, 2010.


Adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Currently Followed in a Tertiary Care Hospital Have a Better Psychosocial Well-Being Than Healthy Adolescents.

Bertamino4,  Marta, Filocamo5,  Giovanni, Dalpra4,  Sara, Palmisani4,  Elena, Solari4,  Nicoletta, Magni-Manzoni1,  Silvia, Schiappapietra4,  Benedetta

IRCCS Fondazione Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy
IRCCS G. Gaslini and Università di Genova, Genova, Italy
IRCCS G. Gaslini and Università di Genova, Genova, Italy
IRCCS G. Gaslini, Genova, Italy
Policlinico Sant'Orsola, Bologna, Italy

Background:

Assessment of health-related quality of life (HRQL) is increasingly recognized as a fundamental component of the clinical evaluation of children with pediatric rheumatic diseases (PRD). It has been suggested that measurement of HRQL be incorporated into routine pediatric rheumatology care. Several studies have investigated the HRQL of children with PRD. However, comparison with healthy children has seldom been attempted.

Objective:

To compare the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and healthy children.

Methods:

472 parents of children with JIA, 232 children with JIA, 801 parents of healthy children, and 796 healthy children completed independently the Pediatric Rheumatology Quality of Life scale (PRQL) (Filocamo et al. Rheumatology 2010). Children with JIA and healthy children who completed the questionnaire were aged > 7–8 years.

Results:

As expected, both parents of children with JIA and JIA children provided worse rating on the physical health (PhH) subscale of the PRQL than did parents of healthy children (p<0.0001) or healthy children (p=0.0002), respectively. However, scores on the psychosocial health (PsH) subscale were comparable between parents of JIA patients and parents of healthy children (p=0.34), and were much worse for healthy children than for children with JIA (p < 0.0001). Stratification of children by age (< 10 years, 10–13 years, > 13 years) showed that proxy- and self-reported scores on the PsH subscale were much worse for healthy children older than 13 years than for the other age groups. These differences were not related to sex or JIA severity. The figure shows the comparison of the frequency of abnormal values in the 10 items of the PRQL as self-reported by adolescents with JIA (continuous line) and healthy adolescents (dotted line). Items 1 to 5 refer to the PhH, whereas items 6 to 10 refer to the PsH.

Conclusion:

To our knowledge, our study is the first to show that psychosocial functioning of adolescents with JIA is better than that of healthy adolescents. This phenomenon may depend, at least partially, on most of the JIA patients attending our clinics for follow-up visits having well-controlled disease with little or no disease activity or disability. This observation deserves further exploration in different populations.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Bertamino, Marta, Filocamo, Giovanni, Dalpra, Sara, Palmisani, Elena, Solari, Nicoletta, Magni-Manzoni, Silvia, et al; Adolescents with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Currently Followed in a Tertiary Care Hospital Have a Better Psychosocial Well-Being Than Healthy Adolescents. [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2010;62 Suppl 10 :207
DOI: 10.1002/art.27976

Abstract Supplement

Meeting Menu

2010 ACR/ARHP