Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 60,
October 2009 Abstract Supplement

The 2009 ACR/ARHP Annual Scientific Meeting
Philadelphia October 16-21, 2009.


A Rheumatology Curriculum That Is Successful in Preparing Internal Medicine Residents for the Rheumatology Portion of the Internal Medicine in-Service Examination and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certification Examination

Erickson1,  Alan R., Cannella2,  Amy C., Moore3,  Gerald F., Mikuls4,  T. R., Klassen5,  Lynell W., O'Dell4,  James R.

UNMC Physicians - Brentwood, LaVista, NE
University of Nebraska Med Ctr, Omaha, NE
Univ Nebraska Med Ctr, Omaha, NE
U Nebraska, Omaha, NE
Univ of Nebraska Med Ctr, Omaha, NE

Purpose:

Teaching internal medicine residents is an important responsibility of academic rheumatologists. At the University of Nebraska Medical Center (UNMC) there is a long-standing and well-developed curriculum for all residents who rotate through rheumatology. In addition to regular teaching rounds, this curriculum includes a didactic lecture series, a computer based x-ray and photographic case series, and 2 distinct and separate 200 question closed book pre- and post-tests. The pre-test answers with explanations are given after the testing to use as a study guide. Using the results of the Internal Medicine(IM) in-training examination and the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification examination as a surrogate marker for educational success, our hypothesis is that a well developed rheumatology curriculum prepares third year internal medicine residents and graduating internal medicine residents for the rheumatology portion of these examinations.

Method:

Subjects include 84 third year internal medicine residents at UNMC from July 2003 through June 2009 that completed the IM in-training examination and all graduating internal medicine residents from 1999–2008. Composite results of the in-training examination completed by third year internal medicine residents and ABIM certification examination results of graduating internal medicine residents were reviewed for each year. A manual count was competed of the number of UNMC third year internal medicine residents who had completed our rheumatology rotation prior to the in-service examination. All internal medicine residents complete our rheumatology rotation prior to graduation and thus prior to the ABIM certification examination. For the IM in-service examination we looked at our national percentile rank. For the ABIM certification examination we looked at our percentile ranking for first time takers.

Results:

The majority of third year internal medicine residents (65%) completed our rheumatology rotation prior to completing the third year in-training examination. Compared to all program's third year IM in-training examination scores, our program ranked in the top 10th percentile for each year from 2003 to 2008. From 1999–2008, 99% of our residents released their ABIM certification scores to our internal medicine program director. On average, our internal medicine residents' scores ranked among the top 30% of first time test takers in the rheumatology subsection (average decile 7.4).

Conclusion:

These results suggest that a well developed curriculum prepares internal medicine residents for the IM in-training examination and the ABIM certification examination. Limitations in this study include the lack of comparative data on other rheumatology curricula and difficulty in generalizing ABIM internal medicine certification board results.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Erickson, Alan R., Cannella, Amy C., Moore, Gerald F., Mikuls, T. R., Klassen, Lynell W., O'Dell, James R.; A Rheumatology Curriculum That Is Successful in Preparing Internal Medicine Residents for the Rheumatology Portion of the Internal Medicine in-Service Examination and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certification Examination [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2009;60 Suppl 10 :1352
DOI: 10.1002/art.26426

Abstract Supplement

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