Arthritis & Rheumatism, Volume 60,
October 2009 Abstract Supplement

The 2009 ACR/ARHP Annual Scientific Meeting
Philadelphia October 16-21, 2009.


Relationship of Weight and Weight Change with Knee Pain and Function in Persons with Symptomatic Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Two-Year Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative

Bujak,  Danuta I., Favors,  Knachelle, Sorkin,  John D., Hochberg,  Marc C.

Purpose:

Overweight is a major risk factor for the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis (OA) and weight loss is recommended as part of the non-pharmacologic management of patients with knee OA. This analysis examined the relationship between weight and weight change and change in self-reported symptoms and function and physical performance in adults with symptomatic radiographic knee OA over two years.

Method:

Data for this analysis were obtained from the Osteoarthritis Initiative (OAI) public access database (http://www.oai.ucsf.edu). Specifically, we examined data from the baseline, 12- and 24-month follow-up visits for subjects with symptomatic radiographic knee OA enrolled in the OAI Progression subcohort. Subjects completed the Western Ontario McMaster Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) and the Knee Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) at all visits and the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) at the baseline and 24-month follow-up visits. Weight was measured with a balance beam scale and physical performance was measured with a timed 20-meter walk at all visits and a timed 400-meter walk at baseline and 24-month follow-up visits; height was measured with a stadiometer at baseline. Names and dosages of medications and dietary supplements were recorded at all visits by trained personnel. Correlations between weight and weight change and change in outcomes were examined in multiple variable adjusted models using repeated measures analysis and generalized estimating equations to control for the correlation between knees in subjects with both knees involved at baseline.

Results:

Of 1388 subjects with symptomatic radiographic knee OA in one or both knees enrolled in the Progression subcohort, 1189 (85.7%) and 1109 (79.9%) completed 12- and 24-month follow-up visits, respectively. The mean (SD) age at baseline was 61.4 (9.1) years; 791 (57.1%) were women and 972 (70.2%) were white. The mean (SD) weight and body mass index (BMI) at baseline were 86.1 (16.2) kg and 30.2 (4.9) kg/m2, respectively. Mean (SD) weight change from baseline to 12 months and from 12 to 24 months were -0.31 (4.2) and -0.06 (3.8) kg, respectively. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, race and use of analgesic and/or antiinflammatory drugs at each visit, weight change was significantly correlated with WOMAC stiffness, function and total score (but not pain score), PASE score and 20-meter walk speed. In similar multiple variable adjusted analyses, absolute weight was significantly correlated with all clinically relevant outcomes with heavier persons having more pain and worse function.

Conclusion:

These data support an association between weight loss and improvement in function assessed by both self-report and performance measures but not pain in persons with symptomatic radiographic knee OA. In addition, greater absolute weight was significantly associated with higher pain scores and worse function at all visits. These data support recommendations for weight loss in persons with symptomatic knee OA.

To cite this abstract, please use the following information:
Bujak, Danuta I., Favors, Knachelle, Sorkin, John D., Hochberg, Marc C.; Relationship of Weight and Weight Change with Knee Pain and Function in Persons with Symptomatic Radiographic Knee Osteoarthritis: Two-Year Data From the Osteoarthritis Initiative [abstract]. Arthritis Rheum 2009;60 Suppl 10 :556
DOI: 10.1002/art.25636

Abstract Supplement

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